ca.portal.admin

Specifying DBname for SQL-defined databases

Discussion created by ca.portal.admin on Dec 22, 2006
Latest reply on Dec 22, 2006 by ca.portal.admin
Some of the 16.2 new features for SQL (database cloning, SQL caching)
are controlled by specifying a DBname. However, this is not done with
the ""SET DBNAME"" command, which has no effect on SQL-defined databases.
Instead, the ""SET DICTNAME"" command (or its equivalent, such as
""CONNECT"") must be used to specify both the dictionary and the user
database. This means that the dictionary and user database must be
defined in a shared DBname.

At our shop, this is quite a problem for existing databases. All of our
dictionaries are currently defined in their own DBnames, and not
combined with user databases. Creating a new DBname with both is not
difficult. But switching over to the new DBname is. We have ""SET
DICTNAME"" or its equivalent in so many places - JCL, user profiles,
application programs, IDMS Server ODBC definitions, etc. Locating and
modifying them all would be a huge project, particularly in production.


As an alternate, I have considered adding all of the related SQL-defined
user databases to each dictionary's DBname. But I am concerned that
this may have some negative effect elsewhere.

Has anyone else experienced this problem? If so, how did you solve it?

Kay Rozeboom
State of Iowa
Information Technology Enterprise
Department of Administrative Services
Telephone: 515.281.6139 Fax: 515.281.6137
Email: Kay.Rozeboom@Iowa.Gov
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Re: Specifying DBname for SQL-defined databases
"Am I missing something? Why create new DBNAMES? Why not just add the
Dictionary segments to the DBNAMES used for the data bases? Do not delete the
Dictionary DBNAMES.

If the dictionaries are used by setting the DICTNAME the existing Dictionary
DBNAME will still be used.

In my experience the effect on Performance is somewhat negligible, in
addition you will have the bind count to help make an informed decision.

Bill Allen

In a message dated 12/22/2006 8:54:35 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
KAY.ROZEBOOM@IOWA.GOV writes:

That is one of my concerns, Chris: whether adding a bunch of
application segments to the dictionary DBnames will affect performance.
We have tried to keep our DBnames as small as possible in the past. And
the dictionaries are used a lot......


-----Original Message-----
From: IDMS Public Discussion Forum [mailTo:IDMS-L@LISTSERV.IUASSN.COM]
On Behalf Of Chris Hoelscher
Sent: Thursday, December 21, 2006 8:37 PM
To: IDMS-L@LISTSERV.IUASSN.COM
Subject: Re: Specifying DBname for SQL-defined databases
one thought on DBNAMEs - there was at one time (and perhaps still
is) a defined sequence to segment searching
is it alphabetical? is it order added to the DBNAME? I do not remember -
but it is a consideration when modifying DBNAMEs

at least the bind counts are added back to the DCMT D DBNAME command so
you can see how is getting hit the most

Chris Hoelscher
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Re: Specifying DBname for SQL-defined databases
"The problem is that, for the new SQL features, ""set DICTNAME"" or
""CONNECT"" has to be used for setting both the dictionary and the user
database at the same time. All of the pre-16.2 documentation refers
only to connecting to dictionaries, not to user databases. So that's
what we did - connected to a DBname containing only the dictionary.
There was no need (until now) to have a DBname that contains both the
dictionary and the user database.

We can add the dictionary segments to the user database DBnames, but
that doesn't solve the problem, because all of the user code, JCL,
profiles, etc. are hard-coded with the DBname that contains only the
dictionary. We can't do any kind of automated mass change, because each
SQL-defined user database will now require its own ""dictionary"" DBname.

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